FS-5000 Spy Radio

Đ Brooke Clarke 2004 - 2012



FS5000 Spy Radio
Description
Purpose & Use
    Millitary Collector Group Post
Boxology
Major Components
    Accessory Kit Contents
    X Box
    H Bar
    Receiver Synthesizer
       Digital Data
       Bottom Digital PCB
       Synthesizer
       DB15 connector between Bottom and Top of Rx
       Central IF PCBs
       Top RF & Mixer PCB
       No micro controller
    Transmitter Controller
           HFS7000 Radio and TCU7000 Control Box
           DB-25 Interface Connector
               20 Nov 2004 New Theory about F0, F1, F2 & F3
               21 March 2005 - Remote Rx Freq Procedure
               28 March 2005 - Tx with Ant Coupler Proc (no Modulation)
               3 April 2005 - Rx & Tx controlled using PC Basic program T, R, 8, 9
           Procedure to Turn on Transmitter
           Testing with DC Power
           Spectrum Analyzer Testing
           Controler Chassis
           Controler Board
    Transmitter
       Top PCB
        BU 1-6 Buss on both Transmitter boards and elsewhere
       Bottom PCB
       Control Connector
       Battery Charger Connector
    Antenna Coupler
       Connector
       Possible Theory of Opertion
    Batteries
    Battery Charger
    Mains AC Power Supply
Configurations
     Normal Use
    Installing Metal Locking Plates
    AC Mains Tanceiver
    Battery Powered Tranceiver
    Battery Charging from AC Mains
    Battery Powered Portable Receiver
Patents

Description

The Field Set 5000 is an H.F. transceiver that receives 50 kHz to 29.999 Mhz in CW, and USB data modes and transmits 0.25 to 30.199 MHz QPSK (or maybe OQPSK) data.    A number of these were sold by Mike Murphy as new units, but missing whatever controlled the transmitter.  They can be used as receivers, but not as transmitters with the Tx controller missing.   My unit may have been made in Nov of 1988.

The receiver is tuned using select and increment pushbuttons with the frequency displayed on a five digit LED display.  There is a switch on the receiver labeled 300 or 3000 which are common filter bandwidths for CW and SSB voice operation.  But the transmitter module has no provision for a microphone input, so why the 3000 bandwidth, maybe for data?

There's speculation about why the Tx controller was removed from the system.  It may be that the transmitter uses frequency hopping and so the hardware Tx controller is not available.  A PC serial port can NOT be connected to the transmitter since this connector is very different from a PC COM port. 

Made in Germany (probably by Siemens) and has a mechanical interlocking provision to hold the various modules in electrical and mechanical contact.  There are a lot of very refined design elements in the radio indicating that this was not the first or only product made by whoever made it, but has incorporated design elements from a number of prior radios.  Someone who has a number of European military radios looking at this set could probably say who made it.

The Field Station received 75 baud SSB J2B (1140/1240 Hz) modulation (Wiki) but transmits 2000 baud VSB C1D modulation.
This means that two Field Stations can NOT communicate with each other, only to a Base Station.

Purpose & Use

If you have any information about this set please let me know.

6 Dec 2004 - I received the following email from a ham operator in Germany . . .
Hi,

the set was made by TELEFUNKEN, Germany, which later
became part of DASA Deutsche Aerospace....
Parts of SIEMENS have been used in this set....
The TX CONTROLLER (processor unit), which is missing,
contained a keyboard for data input, frequency,
selection of crypto-code etc. and a display for tx
frequency and text. Crypto was done internally. There
was no CW mode.... The ATU automatic antenna tuner was
also controlled by the processor unit, which have been
destroyed because of the crypto system....
The set was actually NOT intended for diplo emergency
use! It was intended for spies and for Special
forces..
One of the problems was the tuning of the receiver,
i.e. the frequency had to be set very accurate for the
tx mode used.
It was possible to use spit-frequency mode...
8 Dec 2004 - And another bit of information from Switzerland

may I assure you, that your efforts are highly encouraging myself as
well to bother, press and urge all possible channels to gather any
information possible, we have to hammer the iron while it is hot. I
talked to a guy from Berlin today, who told me of a book, written by
a certain Mr. Norbert Juretzko, who was working for the BND (German
secret service). He was in charge of forming the stay-behind
organisation. He described the work with the FS 5000: They typed in a
message and the time, when it had to be transmitted. The actual
transmission took place unattended, so if DFed by the enemy, they had
the TRX and not the people operating it. The base stationīs messages
where also picked up without operators around. As the batteries are
not of highest capacity, they might have been run down, when
somebody found his way to look after the radio. Thatīs why the
message device had these lithium backup batts, to retain received
messages.


The book mentioned above is probably Bedingt dienstbereit and the English Amazon web page

This is all speculation, as is most of what's on this web page since there's no public documentation on this radio set.  It's not intended for man portable use, like a military man pack or hand held radio. There is talk on the Spy Radio list about it being for use in embassies as an emergency radio.  Note that a number of U.S. embassies have been bombed and afterwards the roof top antenna and maybe the roof will be missing so the ability to load a random wire antenna is important.

If the purpose is for emergency embassy communications then the modulation mode must match a mode that is supported by other embassies of the same country and by the home station of that country.  That's because the embassy with the emergency will be communicating with them and probably not with other radio stations.

The QPSK (this has not been confirmed yet) modulation that the FS5000 transmits (and probably receives) is used for embassy communications with system names like Echotel and Farcos.  There is not much public information on these modes.

Since this is a little know mode on HF it's logical that the Transmitter Controller was removed prior to surplusing these radios.  The Wavecom W51 series decoders can handle both OQPSK and QPSK the others can handle only QPSK, but none of them are equipped  to decode either Echotel or Farcos.  These modes are not listed on the Klingenfuss sampler CDs Set1 and Set2.

A speculation is that this is a mode used only in an emergency like a "war mode" on other electronic equipment that's not used in peace time.

Millitary Collector Group Post

This was the equivalent of today's list servers, but was done by the hand of Dennis R Starkand I thank him for his effort.  There was a series of 4 posts in October of 1999 about the FS5000 as follows:
Subject: MILITARY COLLECTOR GROUP POST, Oct.7/99
***********************************************
FS-5000 "SPY" RADIO!?
Dennis,

Here is some info I obtained in case you want to publish it. I know nothing about the radio.
-------------------------------------------
Harald Hermanns Wrote......

You asked about the FS-5000 manufactured by Telefunken. I gathered the following information :
This ( spy ) radio was produced at the Telefunken branch at St. Wendel, Germany. ( It is the same source my PRT's are coming from and for whom I made maintenance and service  activities at the PRT radios. So I could ask formerly colleagues about this mystery.)

The radios were developed and constructed under a contract with the formerly Western German Army . ( Remember that Germany was separated in East and West and until 1990 the Cold War existed ).  The background  for this contract I could not get to know for different reasons, you will see later.  The radios were tested by the Army at the  " Erprobungsstelle 81 " and at Lager Lechfeld in Bavaria. The results were all other than encouraging. After only a few weeks the radios were given back to Telefunken and the army was no longer interested in this project. The units shall be very unreliable.  Telefunken tried to sell them an other way and, really, a customer was found - the NSA ( by writing this name I will get some problems since all messages from overseas to USA are routed via this agency and they do not like it reading about themselves. But never mind.)  For Telefuinken the world was ok again, but only for them. The NSA soon had to recognize what the German army already knew. This type of radio was not worth the money they had to pay for it. I got the information that some of the units were in service in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait during Desert Storm, but I do not know if they really were.

After this disastorous results the NSA sold the radios on the surplus market and a lot of them shall be to get at Michael Murphy and also the store of Telefunken found it's way to the surplus market in USA. My information from Telefunken are the following : All units still on stock were sold, spare parts or items of this system are not available. All TM's and documentation were destroyed, but not only for the reason of secretness. Telefunken was so  frustrated about this failure that they tried to destroy all remembrance, and this hole in the memory they still have, and it seems to be chronic. This may be the main reason why I could not get much more information from staff members of Telefunken.

Now most of the radios are on US surplus market, but they are quite expensive, I asked some one today and he told me that the amount to get one shall be around $5000. But an other, more technical problem will occur when you by one. Before entering the surplus market a small but important module of the radios was deleted - the controller. Its task was it to control the frequency setting and other main functions of the radio by sending a serial code with a specific data frame to the corresponding modules. Without this controller the complete system is worthless. And even you will find a controller you have to know the specific codes for its use.

Conclusion :
For a collector the FS-5000 perhaps will by of a ( costly ) interest, even the system is incomplete without the controller. For a user with controller and the complete knowledge of the necessary codes the radio will be of less worth. He will get the same impression as long before him the German army and the NSA : very expensive scrap. Today I would not buy such a unit, but the time perhaps will bring the missing and destroyed controllers back together with the knowledge how to use them. I will try to find more information and I am sorry that I am not able to bring you better news If there are new information I will  automatically send you.

ed) Last year, It was made known to me of the existance, and availability, of the FS-5000's along with the "Spy" radio claim. Alway's
sceptical of equipment so branded, I made some inquireries. The below was received from Keith Melton who in other messages confirmed the NSA use.

Yes, I have examined, briefly, the FS5000 and know where they came from. I have a photocopy of the set photograph and can send it to you if you have interest.  The set appears incomplete and is apparently missing the small commercial controlling computer that was used in conjunction with the set.  It may have been the old APPLE 2 unit, or another of that vintage.  The set is extremely well made, but in an incomplete state was of little interest to me.  I hope this helps.

Regards,
KEITH
***********************************************
Subject: MILITARY COLLECTOR GROUP POST, Oct.13/99
***********************************************
MEMBERS WRITE;
FS-5000 Correction,
DENNIS:

A CORRECTION TO THE FS-5000 ARTICLE.
I SELL THEM TO COLLECTORS FOR $1750 (MORE ON MY WEB SITE)
AND THE FREQ CONTROL FOR REC IS PART OF THE SET.

MIKE

MURPHY'S SURPLUS             
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: MILITARY COLLECTOR GROUP POST, Oct.15/99
. . . .
ALSO, REGARDING THE FS-5000.  I THINK DHALMER/BENZ AND DEUITCHE
AEROSPACE( NOT TELEFUNKEN  ?)  WAS THE MAKER OF THE SETS I HAVE.  THEY
PUT OUT A MODEL HRS-7000 ( IN JANES) THAT IS SIMILAR, BUT HAS ALL THE
STUFF IN 2
CHASSIS, AND NOT SEPERATE.

MIKE   .  .  .
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: MILITARY COLLECTOR GROUP POST, Oct.18/99
-----------------------------------------------------------------
More FS-5000, & PRC-55,
.  .  .  .
As near as I can tell from Jane's, AEG Telefunken (at least the division that made the FS-5000) was sold to Deutsche Aerospace and they are now DaimlerChrysler Aerospace. .  .  .
Tom Bryan
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Boxology

There are seven storage boxes to hold the system and all of these can be shipped in a box box 13" x 17" x 13" that weighs 34.1 pounds.
I have heard that the factory cardboard box is marked:

5820-00-H07-0015  (looks like an NSN but does not show up anywhere)
Field Set FS5000
S-1 A-25 C-A
Box C/BRN

Large Box Top
All the large box tops have a shallow 80x100 mm depression where a label could be pasted.  In addition there are three places where lettering could be molded into the plastic, but these have been filled with blank plates using a couple of single slot "-" flat head scrws for each one.  The labels could have been 95x42, 10x70 and 10x45 mm

FS5000 Boxes
This FS5000 system came in 7 boxes.  There are two sizes of box, the small one is about 160x200x120 mm (6.3x7.8x4.7") and the large box is about 320x200x100 mm (12.6x7.8x3.9").  There are four of the larger boxes but only 3 of the smaller boxes.  It appears from symmetry that there is a missing small box.  The boxes have stick-on labels where the label reads a single letter a dash and the common hand written serial number 3186.  The box tops have bumps in the four corners that point up (they are not feet).  The box bottoms also have four dimples that match the bumps allowing the boxes to stack.

Letter(s)
Size
Weight lbs
Contents
A
Big
4.0
Antenna Auto Tuner banana sockets for Ant, ground & 3 coax DB-25(m)
Silicon Sealed cover screws.
B
Small
5.5
2 each special Batteries
C
Big
4.5
Battery Charger
M
Big
4.5
A.C. Mains Power Supply
R
Small
4.0
Receiver
S, X have s/n
H, F, S, S w/o s/n
Small
3.5
  • H = 4 connector block (2 Batt, pwr out & 4 coax db)
    marked "NOT RX" for the 2 parallel battery connection
  • F = heatsink w/ one connector
  • European line cord marked D, N, S, FI,S+, FH2, OVE, K, M, DE, 2.5/250
  • Accessory Box

T
Big
5.5
Transmitter w/ 4 connectors & 4 mechanical joining plates
?
Small
?
box missing Tx Controller?

There may be a number of reasons for the modular construction of this and other spy radios.  The key reason probably related to the ability to pack the modules in normal luggage in such a way as to not draw attention to the fact that you are moving a radio station.  The modules may be moved at different times by different people.  If the FS5000 was shipped as a single unit it would draw a lot of attentions because of the combined weight and size.

The modules can be assembled to accomplish just the task at hand.  For example if an agent desired to send a message and get a response instead of operating the FS5000 can instead take just the TARBB and Transmitter Controller to a remote location and leave them alone.  The time clock in the Transmitter Controller will make the transmission on schedule and will record the response message.  So the modular construction saves taking unneeded modules into the field.

The modules are logical divisions of the radio set and thus are helpful in troubleshooting any problem that might occur.

Major Components

Accessory Kit Contents

<S> (SENNHEISER logo)
The accessory box is designed so that it can be mechanically mounted to the other parts of the system.   But why?

X Box

X Box 3
                  ViewsThe lid screws are #1 Phillips and were installed with Locktite so plenty of down force is needed to keep from striping the (+) mating notches.

Dummy Load
The multipin connector marked Transmitter only has a coax connection inside the box.  All the other pins are no connection.  This coax is routed to a large chip that's mounted with two screws for good heat sinking.  The chip is labeled with a large letter "E" and to the right of the "E" are two more letters that are 1/2 the height and go from top to bottom the top letter is "M" and the lower letter may be an "O" like:
EOM
 This is not exactly correct but you get the idea of the logo.

The Transmitter coax goes to a pin on this chip marked "Input".  The tab on the chip opposite the input is connected to the Red banana jack with the Antenna symbol.  The Transmitter input coax shield is connected to the Black banana jack with the ground symbol. 

The coax input (A2) is part of a DB-25 connector with 10 male pins and the coax has a female center conductor.  It's very similar to the connector on the Antenna adapter and mates to the connector on the top of the transmitter.

I have heard that this is a transmitter test box.  The large chip is probably an attenuator so that the transmitter sees a reasonable VSWR.

In addition the RF PCB has a connection to the Yellow banana jack marked "Test".  On the board there's also what may be pot core inductor or transformer marked 2.044 and right next to it are a couple of mica caps.  This may be a low pass antenna filter or a DC bias-T.

Near the green LED there's a 2N4416 transistor a diode, a resistor, a couple of caps and a test point pin.  The test point pin is 10 k Ohms removed from the RF coax center conductor and so the LED is probably a Transmit on indicator.

The DB-25 connector with the single coax mates to the Tramsmitter connector on the large face.  This means the Antenna Coupler has been removed.

DSU
The DB-25(f) connector has all it's pins soldered to a PCB that's at right angles to the RF board that holds the attenuator chip.  There's a couple of surface mount 74HC86 Quad 2-Input Exclusive OR gates and a number of what's probably resistor chips labeled 100 and 392.  This PCB has NO connection to the RF board, it's completely independent.

What does "DSU" stand for? 
Digital Scrambling Unit is a guess.  There are 8 Exclusive OR gates on the PCB behind the connector.  Exclusive OR gates are commonly used in crypto gear to combine a key and a data stream.  A "Y" cable connected to this unit could be used to combine an 8 bit word with an 8 bit key for either transmission or reception.

The problem with the above guess is that ther eare not enough pins on the connector.  8 XOR gates need 24 pins, plus a DC power and ground which is 26 pins, but the connector only has 25 pins.

Note that the DB-25f connector will not directly mate with the DB-25f connector on the receiver.

H Bar

H Bar 3 views w/
                  conn pin #sThere are two different uses for the H bar.  When used with the battery charger-DC power supply it provides the means to connect one or two batteries to the charger.  When used with the Receiver it allows a single battery to power the Receiver.

There are warning stickers on the side that accepts two batteries that these positions should NOT be used with the receiver.  But it's not possible to connect batteries to either of these connectors and connect the H Bar to the receiver because there are sliding pins that go into holes in the Transmitter (T) and in the Charger (C) but that can not go into the receiver thus mechanically preventing this connection

The battery socket on the face with two battery connectors that's closest to the center is B1 the adjacent battery connector is B2 and the battery connector on the other face used by the receiver is B3  The large connector that mates to either the Charger (C) or the Transmitter (T) is H17.

The high current pins A1 and A2 fit into the high DC current sockets A1, A2 A4 or A4.

Note the the DB-39 shell has no high current sockets in the A1, A2, A3 or A4 positions.  This allows it to mate with the Battery Charger that does have high current pins in these positions and to mate with the receiver that has male coax connectors in these positions.  This is why the DC current is passes using the small pins in the center of the DB-39 connector.

H Bar wiring
B1
B2
B3
Rcvr batt
H17
A1+

A1+ 16
2


1
3


8
A2-
A2- A2- 17

2

2

3

9

A1+
3


2
nc


3
nc

This means that the big charger connector (50) uses pin number 17 as a common battery ground, Pin 16 is the B1 positive, Pin 3 is the B2 positive and pins 1 & 8 are the B1 thermistor and pins 2 & 9 are the B2 thermistor.

When the H bar is used to connect a single battery to the receiver (16) the positive input to the receiver is on pin 16 and negative on pin 17.  So the connector on the Transmitter (21) has pin 16 as a "+12 Volt" output and pin 16 as the 12 volt return.

Receiver Synthesizer

The Receiver is the heart of the FS5000 system.  It contains not only the receiver but also a digital synthesizer with a number of outputs and also has the DB-25 connector that interfaces to the transmitter controller.

The receiver covers 50 kHz to 30 MHz USB (which will receive AM also) in 1 kHz steps.  Uses either a 1 meter telescoping whip screwed into the top of the receiver or an external long wire connected to the antenna tuner - Transmitter combination.

When the Receiver is mated to the Transmitter and turned on the LED display shows 00000 with a decimal point on each digit and the frequency change buttons have no effect.

The synthesizer provides:
  •  a fixed 50.0 Mhz LO to the modulator
  • an LO that varies with the tuned frequency to the modulator:
    LO = Tuned Frequency + 50.2 MHz
  • a 200 kHz clock for the digital modulator in the Transmitter box
  • a 75 Hz clock to pace the transmitter controller when it's sending data to the transmitter

Controles & Indicators & Connectors

Rcvr LEDsOn a 45 degree sloping small panel, left to right:

1 = <Delta>F - fine receive frequency control
2 = Headphone Jack
3 = + red LED
4 = - red LED
5 = Volume Control

On the top surface is a threaded hole (15)  that would accept the telescoping antenna.

A lower small panel has left to right:
6 = DB-25(f) connector, no coax porst - This is the interface to the missing Transmitter Control Box
7 = F <- button for frequency digit select
8 = f ^ button to change frequency of one digit
9 = 5 digit LED frequency display (1 kHz to 29,999 kHz)
10 = 300 - 3000 toggle switch for IF bandwidth
11 = OFF - On toggle switch

Just above this panel (12) is the mechanical latch mechanism to hold the Transmitter Controller.

Rcvr Tx FaceOn a side there's a DB-39 shell (16) with 17 male pins and 4 female coax connectors.  This connector will mate to the one on the "H" 4 connector block in the "S,X" packing box.  The "H" bar is a way to connect one battery to the Receiver for receive only use.  This connector also mates to one on the Transmitter, but not to the other connector on the the transmitter that appears to be similar, not becasue it's the wrong connector, but because there are metal pins the prohibit making that connection.  This design seems fool proof.


The "2" metal plate can be placed on the Transmitter, prior to attaching the Receiver, sitting in the groove with the hole nearest the edge of the transmitter and with the lugs facing the Receiver.  Then, after the receiver connector is mated to the Transmitter the plate can be moved toward the batteries and it will "snap" into place by means of a plastic part (14) on the back (15) of the receiver.

The two each "1" metal plates are for latching the batteries to the transmitter.

The "3" metal plate is for latching the Transmitter controller to the transmitter.

Receiver Connectors Wiring

DB-25 (6)
17 pin (Con 16)
Function
1


2
2

3
3

4
4

5
5

6
6

7
7

8


9
9

10
10

11
11

12


13
13

14


15


16

75 Hz sq wave out
17

digital data out
18
12

19


20


21


22


23
15

24
16
+12 V in
25
17
12 V return
  The reason there are a number of common pins may be that these are "pass through" lines where the Receiver does not do anything to these signals.  There are 12 of these signal lines.

DB-25 Power
By powering the Receiver using pins 24 (+14 V) and 25 (gnd) the Tx interface connector can be probed with the receiver active.  The receive current draw is about 200 ma.
The A3 connector has a 200 kHz sine wave output with about 350 mv pk-pk amplitude.
The A2 connector has a 50 MHz sine wave that's probably around 350 mv pk-pk, measures about 150 mv on my HP 54501A 100 Mhz scope.

Tx Interface Con 17 DC voltages in receive mode

Pin
VDC
1
0
2
0.28
3
0
4
0
5
0
6
0
7
5
8
0
9
0.94
10
0
11
0
12
0
13
0.45
14
0.94
15
0
16
13.98
17
0.0

Digital Data

Looking at the Rx DB-25 connector (6) pins with a scope shows a 75 Hz square wave on pin 16 and digital data on pin 17.

Bottom Digital PCB

Rcvr Bot PCB BotOn the PCB in the bottom of the receiver between pins 3 and 4 of the 4 coax connector (16) there are small drops of black and green dielectric that appear to be capacity tweaking.  Just above this nest of traces is the stamped message: "-3,0 Hz".   These dots are some type of revision marking, not tweaking.  They appear on many of the other boards in close proximity to the long white silkscreen number that's the board ID, typically a group of 3 dots, probably using reisitor color code, so black black green would be 005.

The PCB ID may be "L.3601.01/01" that's etched in metal whereas "3.600.00/00" is printed in white paint.

The DB-25 connector is at the bottom right of the photo and is labeled "BU2".  In the center of the PCB there's what appears to be a 38 pin IC and pins 1, 19, 20 and 38 are numbered.  The ICs: 4011 (2 input NAND), 4013 (Dual D FF), 4023 (Triple 3 Input NAND) & 4093 (Quad 2 Input NAND) are inside the 38 pin pattern.

Opening up the bottom Synthesizer

Screws Not to be removed
The two (-) scrwes holding the 4 coax support blocks
and the 4 (+) screws in the center of the PCB
and the two (-) screw sholding the DB-25 connector hex nuts should NOT be removed when taking the PCB out of the box. 

Screws to remove
After removing the 2 (-) screws near the shield can,
 the screw and 5 mm nut on the top of the DB-25 connector and pressing it down to free the Silicon sealing,
the two (+) screws holding the 4 coax connector to the box can be removed.

The 4 (+) captive screws that release the bottom from the top of the receiver.  Seperate the top and bottom by folding the two parts using the 4 coax cables as a hinge.  Then unplug the 4 coax connectors from the bottom part.  Note the 4 coax connectors have shrink tubing labeled to match the call outs on the bottom shield metal palate.

Now the PCB be lifted up on the  edge furthermost away from the 4 coax connector.  The 4 coax connector is holding the board now because of the Silicon seal.   The 4 coax connector comes out with the PCB.  I left the wires going to the bandwidth and On-OFF toggle switches.

 There's a big screw on top of the bottom synthesizer housing, but it only holds a TO-5 heat sink which attaches to a transistor by fingers, so it does not need to be removed, the transistor just unplugs. 

Bottom Synthesizer

Rx Tx SynthThere is a 10 MHz Tele Quarts OCXO marked - 3 Hz.
A 44 pin metal can IC marked KS 1075 and a 38 pin metal can IC marked KS1076.
Also a shield can has been constructed over a part of the PCB that about 88 x 31 mm.
A 16 pin IC SP8690A (prescaler) , CA3140T, and what may be a few op amps or transistors.

This is probably all synthesizer circuitry.

PCB is a 4 layer board, not a 3 layer as I previously thought.  This can be seen by looking at the area adjacent to the DB-25 connector on both sides of the board.



Top RF & Mixer PCB

The inside of the bottom cover has a sheet of RFI gasketing with fingers that go all the way around the cover to box joint.  Maybe TEMPEST level shielding.

Rx PCB top under Top
            coverThe top cover also has TEMPEST type shielding.  There are two compartments on the top side. 

The First is associated with the antenna and it has only a red wire and a coax going to the other section.  The PCB is marked 3.100.00/00 in white paint.  There's a SPDT switch beside the antenna socket that's actuated when the telescoping antenna is installed.  Also near the antenna socket there's a static snubber and some diodes maybe as signal level limiters.

The SPDT switch appears to be installed after a 3 transistor RF amp.  This is a very hot amp and you may get better reception with the antenna not extended.  There is one coax coming into this compartment to a spot on the PCB marked "ST1" which is not far from the SPDT switch.  Most likely this is the RF feed from the Transmitter when in receive mode.
There are 6 shielded inductors (L7, L8, L9, L10, L11 and L12) which may indicate the frequency spectrum is broken down into 6 bands. Maybe:
Band 1 0.5 - 0.989
Band 2 0.989 - 1.957
Band 3 1.957 - 3.873
Band 4 3.873 - 7.663
Band 5 7.663 - 15.162
Band 6 15.162 - 30.0
This way each band is just under one octave wide, making for good filtering and low spurs.  But it would be difficult to get good band separation with just the inductors in the front end.  Maybe they are just part of the filtering scheme.  There is another level or two in the receiver between this board and the bottom board.

The other compartment on the top level looks like the LO and mixer section.  It's marked 3.200.00/00 in white paint.
There are 4 crystals fairly close to each other and centered in the compartment.  The frequencies are 50.191, 51.556 & two others that can not easily be read.  Interesting that they are close together in frequency.  There are some wire gimmicks near the crystals and signs of tweaking with dielectric paint.  This probably is a crystal filter at the frist LO frequency that's centered at 50.2 MHz.

Thre are a number of 0.1" type jumpers around the IF section:
12-13-16 may be between the RF and IF sections
3-4-5 is next to an RF/or IF transformer
2-14 is near another transformer
10-11-15 is near an IF can.

There are 2 coax cables going down from this compartment.  The one marked "17" goes to A2 on the 4 coax connector (16).  This is also the LO going to the transmitter connector 20-A2.

The other coax has a connector marked "310"  and the jack on the PCB is marked "2" and it does not appear to be routed outside the receiver box.  Jack "2" is right next to a BFT66 transistor marked "1".  This might be the IF output going to the rest of the receiver.

Local Oscillator

The top receiver PCB coax connection "17" seems to be a LO comming from the synthysizer on the center level.  This LO signal also goes to the transmitter by way of the A2 coax connection (16).

The LO is on the high side of the tuned frequency:
LO = Tuned Frequency + 50.2000000 MHz

The first IF is at 50.2 MHz.

Summary of the top PCB

The whip antenna always feeds a 3 transistor amplifier.  Either the amplified whip RF or the RF from the Antenna Coupler by way of the Transmitter is selected by the switch in the whip antenna socket.  The RF then goes to one of the 6 single pole band pass filters then via a 1" coax to the mixer compartment.  After mixing it's put through the first IF filter centered at 50.2 MHz and fed down the "310" coax to the central IF boards.  The LO (at the Rx frequency plus 50.2 MHz) is also fed to the transmitter on the A2 coax connector.

Tx top PCB shows A1 as the variable LO and A2 as a fixed LO freq. which seems different from A2 being the variable LO port?

Central IF PCBs

Rx CntrAfter the bottom cover is removed and the 4 captive screws down behind the notches in the bottom PCB are backed out the receiver case can be split open.  Connecting the top and bottom portions of the receiver are 4 coax cables and a miniature DB-15 pin connector that may be identical to the one used for the SVM-68 to radio connection.  The coax supplying the signal from the antenna tuner is marked 101 on the bottom half of the receiver.  The LO comes up from the bottom through the 210 coax.  It's not clear what the 311 and 411 coax cables are carrying.

There appear to be 2 PCBs in the top side.  The deeper one has a couple of mechanical filters on it marked:
FZ2410 (200 Pf, 130 pF) and FE 223 (39 pF, 39 pF)  The circuitry appears to be analog IF.  There is a 24 pin chip marked:
TEZ, C 18081 S, 103707, what is this?

The top most PCB is marked 3.400.000/00 with ink dots of 001.
The copper shield with the spring fingers on the bottom part is marked 3.520 with color dots of 000.

There are no PCBs on the lower side, just a sheet copper shielding material with fingers all around the perimeter.

15 Pin Miniature Connector between top & Bottom of Receiver BU10

Note that this is the only non coax connection between the bottom of the receiver (where the DB-25 Tx control connector is located and the Top of the receiver containing the RF, IF and demodulator are located.
Pin #
Name
Function
Tx Interface Con
1

Digital data from
receiver top
17
2
Tdc
+5v = Tx  DC on
T/R relay to T
9
3
Gnd
Ground 25
4



5



6
Gnd
Ground

7
TCL
T BU 1-6#4 TCL 12
8



9

R 75 Hz sq wave 16
10
Gnd
Ground 25
11



12

some top receiver i.e.
RF, IF or demod related
14
13
Gnd
Ground

14
+12V
+ 12 V to R 24
15




There is also a flat in line10 pin connector ST2 that goes to the boards above the PCb visable when the top and bottom parts are parted.
BU1 is a 9 conductor buss connecting to the PCB directly below that connects to the two IF filters.  There is a resistor between raised terminals 1 and 2 and another between terminals 6 and 7 that are factory select resistors that were installed after the box was assembled.

BU9 and test point 13 are the coax going to 411 on the receiver bottom.
Coax 311 on the bottom goes to the PCB holding the IF filters.

Encrypted Digital Transmit and Receive

There is no indication that a microphone or key is used with this system.  There are some clues that indicate this is a transceiver designed for sending and receiving encrypted digital traffic.

The two LEDs on the receiver marked "+" and "-" and the associated delta frequency screwdriver adjustment would be needed to get the Receiver tuned correctly to some type of digital transmission.

The single low quality ear phone could be used to hear the data and during the receiver tune process, but not for receiving a message.

The DSU may be for combining a key and the data stream or maybe as part of a test of the Transmitter Controller.

No micro controller in Receiver

There is no visible micro controller (or microprocessor) in the receiver.  The lower section has the frequency synthesizer function.  The synthesizer PCB has two hermetically sealed can large pin count custom ICs where the top IC is mounted to a daughter PCB that sits directly over the lower 38 pin part.  There are a number of coax lines going from near the bottom chip and from the daughter board to the shielded box at the rear of the synthesizer PCB which must contain the VCO and related RF circuitry.  These parts provide the digital synthesizer functionally.  Although it's possible that they contain a micro controller which might be used for other things, it's extremely unlikely. 

Note that the Antenna coupler does contain a micro controller and it is in the form of 5 seperate large pin count micro controller specific chips.  Although it's possible for the Antenna coupler micro controller to respond to commands sent by means of the DB-25 connector on the receiver it's also very unlikely.  If the Antenna coupler micro controller was running the rest of the system then the DB-25 connector would properly be on that box instead of on the Receiver box.

The Antenna coupler does have the F0, F1, F2, F3 and FC lines and so will know what frequency has been programmed into the FS5000.

If this section is correct and the Receiver does not have any intelligence then the command structure will be fairly simple and close to what is done using manual frequency entry.

Transmitter Controller

April 2012 - systems on eBay Germany with Controller, but I missed them.
FS5000 Controller
        from eBay April 2012

Warning
If you are going to be working on making a controller you MUST fuse the hot and ground wires to the DB-25 connector
and make absolutely sure that none of the DB-25 wires can touch ground even for a microsecond.
I let the smoke out of my receiver PCB and needed to make a repair and someone else has had to go through the same pain.

"Hole" for Tx CtrlrWhen the following modules are combined: Transmitter, Antenna coupler, Mains power supply, battery Charger, Battery, Battery Receiver and accessory Kit there is a space under the accessory Kit and in front of the Mains power supply and charger and to the right of the Receiver where the Transmitter Controller fits.

On the left of the Tx Ctrlr there is a downward pointing DB-25m connector to mate with the connector on the receiver.  Also pointing to the left are a couple of pins with heads (similar to pan head screws) that are captured by the lever on the Receiver and as the lever is closed the pins are forced down which mates the two DB-25 connectors.  The Receiver has a 3.43 mm diameter pin that goes into a hole on the transmitter controller.

There are no connections to the Mains supply or to the battery Charger.  This is logical since the FS5000 may be deployed in the field without them.

Based on the 6 & 8 Dec 2004 email the Transmitter controller would have the following functions:

  • Keyboard for data entry
  • Frequency input for Tx and Rx
  • Input of crypto key
  • Display for frequency or data
  • Clock to transmit automatically so agent wuld not need to be there
  • Lithium battery backed retention of  received messages to allow NiCad batteries to go flat without loss of Rx msg

  • This is missing from the systems that have been sold as surplus.  It probably fits in one of the small boxes.  The space under the accessory kit suggests that the size is 45 mm high, 125 mm wide (150 mm including a DB-25m connector) and 100 mm deep

    The controller has a DB-25m connector that mates to the Receiver's DB-25f connector (6) and is machannically attached to the system using the lever (12) on the Receiver.  Note this lever is designed to press the Transmitter Controller down onto the Receiver's DB-25 connector (6).

    10 Aug 2006 - Some speculation about the controller.  It probably contained some type of encryption/decryption that was not a one type pad, but rather more like DES where a key is used that's much shorter than the message length.  The Transmitter and Receiver were probably controlled by a timer in the control box.  That way the spy would not be near the hardware during either transmission or reception.  The crypto key would work in such a way that the data to be sent would be encrypted and the key erased prior to placing the transmitter.  When receiving a message the encrypted message would be stored in the controller and only later when the key was entered could the plain text message be seen.

    HFS7000 Radio and TCU7000 Control Box

    The HFS 7000 military radio made by Telefunken has specs very similar to the FS5000.  More interesting is the TCU7000 control box.  At the top it has a 2 line by 40 character LCD.  Directly under the LCD and evenly spaced are 5 keys marked F1, F2, F3, F4 and F5 that relate to legends displayed directly above them on the lower line of the LCD, i.e. a menu system.
    The Telefunken HRM 7000 is very similar, Manpack, Vehicle & Fixed versions.  Brochure for 7000 Family.

    Below the function keys there is a 4 row typewriter style keyboard with 41 keys.  To the left of "A" is what's probably the shift key.  At the right of the row starting ASDF... is a larger key that's orange in color.  This might be used with the shift key as a zeroize key.
      F1      F2      F3      F4      F5
    1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   0

    Q   W   E   R   T   Y   U   I   O   P
    ^   A   S   D   F   G   H   J   K   L <Orange key>
    Z   X   C   V   B   N   M   ;   .   -

    DB-25 Transmitter Controller Interface Connector (marked # 6 in Receiver photo)

    Tx Controller
    Rx con 6
    Rx con 16
    Tx con 20
    Tx con 17
    Ant Cplr con 24
    DB15
    Name
    Function
    RBH
    VDC
    TRBB
     (no A)
    V DC
    TARBB
    V DC
    1



    IFBW
    open=3kHz, gnd=300 Hz
    Note 6
    4.66
    0.50
    0.5
    2 RA
    2
    3

    F0
    A F0 Note 11
    0
    0
    0.2
    3 RA
    3
    2

    F1
    A F1
    0
    0.4
    0
    4 RA
    4
    7

    F2
    A F2
    0
    0
    0
    5 RA
    5
    1

    F3
    A F3
    0
    0
    0
    6 RA
    6
    9

    FC
    A FC Note 10
    0
    0
    0
    7 RA
    7


    Fman
    /Rcvr Man Freq Lock Note 2
    5
    5
    0.9
    8 r



    RxOff open=Rx on, gnd=Rx Off
    Note 5
    5.2
    5.1
    5.1
    9 T
    9

    2
    Tdc
    +5v = Tx  DC on
    T/R relay to T
    Must be off for Rx
    1.9
    0.3
    0.3
    10 T
    10


    TX
    T BU 1-6#1 TX
    0
    0
    0
    11 T
    11


    RF
    T BU 1-6#2 RF
    +5v = RF on
    0
    0
    0
    12 TR


    7
    coax
    TCL
    T0
    T BU 1-6#4 T0
    connects mod exciter directly to ATU
    for preliminary ant tune
    no connection to synth
    only top RF, IF
    Note 9
    0
    0
    0
    13 TR
    13


    SL/Tune 0.8 = Synth lock
    hi= no lock (floating?)
    Note 7
    0
    0
    0
    14 R


    12
    coax
    AGC Gnd = full gain
    high = no gian
    Note 8
    1.2
    0.8
    0.8
    15
    -
    -
    -
    -
    no connection 0
    -
    -
    16 RT


    9
    CLK
    R 75 Hz sq wave out
    Note 3
    2.5
    2.5
    2.5
    17 RT


    1
    RxD
    R digital data out
    Note 1
    jumping jumping
    jumping
    18 T
    12


    ?
    0
    0
    0
    19



    ?
    0
    0
    0
    20
    -
    -
    -
    -
    no connection
    0
    -
    -
    21
    -
    -
    -
    -
    no connection 0
    -
    -
    22
    -
    -
    -
    -
    no connection 0
    -
    -
    23
    15


    ?
    0
    0
    0
    24 R
    16


    +12V
    + 12 to R
    Note 4
    14.98
    14.58 batt
    14.58
    25 RT
    17
    4
    3, 6
    10,13
    Gnd
    Ground
    0
    0.0
    0.0

    A capital letter appearing in the Pin column means there is a connection to that box, a small letter means the connection has a resistance greater than 1 Meg Ohm.  All measurements made with no batteries or power connected.

    Note 1 - Digital TTL data from the receiver demodulator.

    13 Dec 2004 - This data switches from about -0.060 Volts to +5.06 volts and is coming from the demodulator in the receiver.  That's why sometimes it's there and other times it's not. 

    By sending in a 20.000000 MHz signal with a 100% AM square wave modulation at 420 Hz the output is not a square wave but quite a few pulses with flat tops.  With the delta frequency control set fully CCW the output is about 0 volts and when fully clockwise mostly +5 volts.

    Phase modulation also causes  the TTL digital data.  Adjusting the fine frequency control with a small screw driver will cause the data to come and go.  This indicates that the receiver really should be able to tune in 0.1 kHz steps and not the existing 1.0 kHz steps.  I have not found any combination of RF frequency, FM deviation and modulation frequency that will cause a digital output.

    This means that the transmitter controller would need to take in this TTL serial data stream and convert it into a message.  This probably included applying some cryptographic cipher.

    Note 2 - The actual function of pin 7 is not yet known.

    The email of 6 Dec 2004 indicates that the Tx and Rx frequencies can be split (set to different values).  This would require a way to tell the FS5000 that the following frequency input was either for the transmitter or receiver.  Pin 7 effects the input of frequency data and is adjacent to pins 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 which I think are used for remote frequency entry.  This proximity in the pin numbering is a strong indicator that this pin is also related to frequency entry.

    9 Dec 2004 - When 4.5 Volts is applied to this pin in the TARBBMC configuration the setting of a frequency is enabled.  Without this pin high you can not change the frequency in the TARBB or TARBBMC configurations.  Also if the main ON-OFF switch is turned off and later back on all the digits to the left are still there, but the right most digit is a zero with the decimal point indicating that it should be set.  If the power switch is cycled the decimal point moves to the left and the next digit is now zero.

    Note that when the Antenna coupler is attached to the system it pulls this pin low turing off the ability to manually set the receiver frequency.  Connecting just the transmitter does not effect this pin.

    Note 3 - This square wave could be used to drive a clock in the Tx Controller.  Seems strange that it's not 60 or 50, but it would be no problem to divide it by 75 to get a one second tick.  The advantage would be that the oscillator in the Receiver is a very high quality unit and so would allow keeping very good time.  The problem is that when the main batteries go dead the clock would stop.  This may or may not be a problem.

    If the Transmitter Controller had an independent clock then it could turn the FS5000 on and off a number of times on some schedule of repeated attempts to both receive messages and to send a message.  This could be done over and over where in the end the attempts were no longer effective since both of the batteries have gone dead.  This type of approach would be good for getting a message through but not so good in terms of minimizing the talk time and hence the ability of the local DF unit to detect and locate the FS5000.

    13 Dec 2004 - After seeing that pin 16 is the demodulated digital data output checking pin 16 shows a 75 Hz square wave with magnitude -0.06 to +5.06 Volts.  Testing in the RBH configuration.  Turning off the RF has no effect on the 75 Hz clock that comes from the synthesizer, not the RF-IF-audio part of the receiver.

    14 Dec 2004 - This may be a clock used to synchronize data bits to be transmitted with the modulator.  This clock is probably locked to the 200 kHz clock that drives the modulator.  Since at every change on the TX pin causes some number of cycles of the modulator it's important that the modulator be driven synchronously.  For testing this signal might be feed into the TX pin?

    Note 4 - the battery voltage that is on pin 24 is for powering the transmitter controller and not for powering the receiver for normal use, although it could be used for receiver testing.
    Note
    This is extreamly dangerous.
     If shorted it will smoke the bottom Receiver PCB!


    Note 5 - If pin 8 is pulled to ground the receiver turns off.  If pin 8 is then floated the receiver stays off.  When pin 8 is pulled up the receiver turns back on.  It's probable that the transmitter controller has a pull down resistor on pin 8 so that when it's connected to the FS5000 system the system is normally off.  Pin 8 is then pulled high to turn on the receiver.  The power for this can come from the DB-25 connector pin 24 and/or from the battery that's internal to the Tx controller.  Test done in RBH configuration.

    Note 6 - The receiver IF bandwidth switches to 300 Hz when pin 1 is grounded and goes back to 3,000 Hz when the pin is floated.  Test done in RBH configuration.

    When the transmitter is connected to the receiver this pin is pulled down automatically switching to the narrower bandwidth.

    Some speculation on why the 2 receive IF bandwidths.  The transmit modulator has a 500 Hz output center frequency and probably has a bandwidth less than 300 Hz.  When initially tuning in a station the 3,000 Hz position is used then after the station is centered using the fine adjustment the BW is switched to 300 Hz to improve the s/n ratio.  If only one remote station is being worked the fine frequency adjustment may need to be made once and from then on it should be good for any frequency transmitted.

    Note that selecting the narrow bandwidth also turns off the LED display, that's why connecting the transmitter to the receiver causes the LED to go black.

    Note 7 - For receive operation when a pull up resistor is applied to pin 13 and the synthesizer is not locked the pin is pulled to ground.  When the synthesizer is locked then the pin is open and can be pulled up to 5 Volts.

    For transmit operation, after a frequency has been set into the synthesizer, while the antenna coupler is tuning the line stays low (meaning correct frequency), but when there's a successful antenna tune the line goes high.

    Note 8 AGC - This is the AGC line and can be used two ways:
      Looking at the voltage on this line gives an indication of the signal strength. 
    1 Volt for noise
    3 Volts for a strong signal
    The AGC can be pulled up or down:
    Pulling down increases the gain
    Pulling up lowers the gain

    Note 9 TCL, T0 - When the modulator is working it feeds this line a 1 kHz square wave.  The TCL line is used to control a relay on the power amplifier board that either sends the exciter low power modulated RF to the antenna coupler or to the power amplifier input.  It would not make sense to be modulating this relay with a 1 kHz signal during transmission so this must be a buss line that is held in one state during a transmission.  Or it may be relay switched to do different functions depending on what's going on?

    Blown PCB traces & Repair

    22 Nov 2004 -  Found open trace from pin 25 and repaired it.  When turned on in configuration RHB noticed that the Red wire from pin 24 had exposed conductor and started to get some tape to cover it, but it touched the black wire causing smoke.  So now I know why the pin 25 trace was blown open.  But my repair made this trace have higher current carrying capability.  Now a trace that's in the center of this 4 layer board has blown.   It will be more difficult to repair it.

    8 Dec 2004 - By soldering a #30 wire wrap wire from the DB-25 pin 24 to the Tx interface connector pin 16 the Receiver has been restored to working condition.

    In the RTBBX configuration when Tdc is pulled high a pulse train appears on pin 17.  -4 V to + 1 V at a frequency of 1.25 kHz.  High for 400 uS and low for 100 uS.  In the RHB configuration this does not happen.

    Note 10 -FC (21 Nov 2004)

    When in the RHB (Receiver, H bar & Battery) configuration and the LED display is on, the FC pin has a clock signal at about 500 Hz with voltage levels of +100 mv and - 50 mv.  I would call this a weak and noisy signal, not one that's useable. 

    If the LED is turned on and one of the inner digits has the active decimal point and then a pulse is applied to the FC line the active digit moves to the left just as if the "<-f" button was pressed.  So it looks like this is the Frequency Column input.

    Note 11 - F0, F1, F2 & F3

    There are not enough unaccounted for pins for the transmitter controller to use pins (i.e. parallel data) to set the transmit frequency so it's probably done with a serial data stream or using the frequency butttons on the receiver.  The F0, F1, F2 and F3 signals might be the high order frequency bits.  2 ^ 15 is 32768 so it would take 15 bits to specify  the frequency to 1 kHz.  The bit weights would be: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048, 4096, 8092 and 16184 kHz.  Then the meaning of the F0 through F3 bits might be: 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 MHz

    If BCD weighting was used then the 10 MHz digit would need 2 bits and the other 5 digits would use 4 bits each for a total of 22 bits.  Then the F0 and F1 might be associated with 10 MHz (i.e. 0, 10, or 20 MHz would be valid) and the F2 and F3 would be the 8 and 4 MHz bits for the 1 MHz digit (i.e. 0, 4 or 8 MHz).  If this was the case the the  possible meanings would be: 0, 4, 8, 10, 14, 18, 20, 24, 28, 30 MHz.  There are 9 small green LEDs next to the transmitter output filter bank so this may be more likley than a pure binary bit assignment.

    The Transmitter needs to know how to select the correct output filter and the antenna tuner needs to know roughly the frequency that needs to be matched (this determines which matching elements are significant and which don't matter). This can be provided by the 4 Band select bits.

    20 Nov 2004 - New Theory

    The receiver can be manually tuned using just two momentary push buttons, one to change the Frequency column and the other to advance the selected frequency digit.  One way to do this would be to have parallel switch contacts on the DB-25 connector.  Maybe Frequency Advance and Frequency Column wires?  Another way that would be faster is to have a nibble (1/2 of an 8 bit "bite" i.e. 4 bits is called a "nibble") to set the frequency digit and that takes 4 wires (F3, F2, F1, F0) and still needs the Frequency Column function, but no longer needs the Frequency Advance function.  This would allow setting any frequency very quickly, supporting either hopping or a sweep.  Testing this is the next order of business.

    The FC line has the same effect as the "<-f" button.  This means the new theory may very well be how the controller sets the frequency.

    21 March 2005 - Remote Rx Freq Procedure

    Ray Robinson has discovered the key to remote programming the receive frequency.  This must have been difficult since the LED frequency is blanked during remote frequency entry.  It turns out that the controller sets 7 digits of frequency like 12,345,670 Hz. where the 1 Hz digit can not be set but the 10 Hz and higher digits are set.  This makes sense since setting to 10 Hz is about the same as using the manual fine tune knob.

    Note that the LED display has only 5 digits (i.e. down to 1 kHz), but using the controller you might be able to set with 10 Hz resolution, although it's not clear if the least significant digits really are setting the frequency.

    The procedure is:
    Ray's Basic program to drive the printer port on a old PC needs an adapter board in line between the computer and the FS5000.
    Note that Ray also suffered bad luck by allowing part of the adapter board to short out the power line and smoked part of his receiver bottom PCB.
    So the recommended hookup is as follows:
    [computer] [Centronics-----cable----DB-25f] [DB-25m---adapter board---DB-25f] [DB-25m----cable----DB-25f] [FS5000]
    This way the connection at the FS5000 is clean with no chance of a problem there, but the adapter board is still critical.

    28 March 2005 - Tx with Ant Coupler Procedure (no Modulation)

    This procedure activates the transmitter after the antenna coupler has tuned the antenna.
    1. Set Rxoff high
    2. Set Tdc high
    3. Set Fman high
    4. For I = 1 to 7
      1. Set BCD frequency digit
      2. Pulse Fc
    5. Next I
    6. Set Fman Low (now F0, F1 & F2 are the LPF select lines)
    7. Set LPF (0 through 7 on F0, F1 & F2)
    8. Wait for Synth Lock to go high indicating good antenna tune
    9. SET RF high to transmit

    Transmitter Low Pass Filter

    The LPF is set using the F0, F1 & F2 lines (F3 does not seem to have any meaning for this).  When Fman is low these lines select the LPF.
    F2,F1,F0
    LPF
    0
    Out
    30 Mhz or 50 Ohms?
    1
    3 Mhz
    2
    4 MHz
    3
    6 MHz
    4
    8 MHz
    5
    12 Mhz
    6
    16 MHz
    7
    20 Mhz

    3 April 2005 - Ray's Basic language program now allows setting the Rx and Tx frequency and switching back and forth between Tx and Rx modes.  It also forces a the antenna coupler to tune when the Tx frequency is set.  But the transmitter is only being keyed on and off, no modulation is being sent or received.   The same adapter board is needed.  There is a possibility that the receiver is still operational during transmit, so the radio may have full duplex capability.  The Function keys on the PC keyboard are:
    Note there is no fuse in the receiver box so if pin 24 is allowed to touch ground (pin 25 or any metal on the FS5000) traces on the receiver PCB will be destroyed and a repair will be needed.  See the 21 March 2005 post for a suggested cabling scheme that will minimize the danger.
    4 April 2005 - The controller lines should be shielded both to prevent computer generated hash from getting into the FS5000 and also to keep the FS5000 output RF from getting into the computer.

    22 April 2005 - A note on the offsets needed for using the FS5000 for CW ops to work with the USB Rx mode of the FS5000.
    - Tx freq 200kHz lower than the actual transmitted signal
    - Rx freq 1 kHz lower than the operating freq. 

    Procedure to Turn on Transmitter

    Procedure from Chris Lumsden:  

    Controler Chassis

    It may be possible to ue a commercial off the shelf equipment chassis to house a controller.  The Hammond 1444-8 case is 6x4x2 inches and has a mating lid 1434-8.
    Mouser part numbers 546-1444-8 and 546-1434-8.
    FS5000 Spy
                  Radio with Hammond 1444-8 chassis

    FS5000 Spy Radio with Hammond
                  1444-8 chassis

    Controller Board

    Ray's FS5000 Prototype Controller
                  Board VK2NO
    This uses the PIC AXE, but
    a PIC 16F887 could also be
    installed in the socket.

    A (dn 2 sec): Pwr On
    A (press): Pwr Off

    B (BW): toggle Wide/Narrow

    C (Catch, i.e. Rx): Freq

    D ( Deliver, i.e. Tx) "T/o"

    #: Load Rx Freq
    *: Load Tx Freq
    Ray's Working FS5000 Prototype
                  Controller Board VK2NO
    Working on FS5000 using battery power.
    6 Mar 2010


    Transmitter

    TransThis transmitter uses digital In phase and Quadrature ( I&Q) modulation methods which are very much more sophisticated than the more common RTTY modes used on H.F.   The mode is likley either QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying) or OQPSK (Offset -QPSK, where no 180 degree changes are made).  The power output can be adjusted using the "PO" pot near the final amplifier stage on the bottom PCB.  With the factory setting the CW output is about 40 Watts.

    The Transmitter interfaces to the Receiver and to both batteries or to the Charger + AC Mains supply.  The top 3 coax DB type connector (17) mates to either the X Box or the Antenna Auto Tuner.  The A2 coax is the RF output that feeds the X Box for Tx testing or feeds the Antenna coupler.

    The front side has connectors for battery one (18), battery two (19) and the Receiver  D type connector with 4 coax ports (20).  On the side is a connector (21) that looks very similar to the one used for the receiver, except this connector does not have any coax connections instead the coax psitions are filled with sleeves that prevent the receiver from mating.  There's also pins that prevent the receiver from mating.  None of the pins on connector (21) connect to other (21) pins.

    There is a groove (22) above the three connectors (18, 19 & 20) that holds the "1" (battery) and "2" metal locking plates.  Above the Tansmitter Controller connector (21) there is a groove (23) to hold the "3" metal locking plate.  There are also grooves in the Antenna Auto Tuner just above the grooves (22, 23) on the transmitter.

    The only pins that are common between the two large connectors are 15 and 17 (gorund).

    Tx Top PCB Modulation & LO Mixing

    Top PCBOne side has a number of ICs.  These include a couple of 28L22 PROMs wiich are arranged as 256 bytes and next to these are a couple of AD7524 8 bit ADCs.  They are not fast enough for RF synthysis, but would be great for an I-Q modulator.  Next to these is a SE5514N Quad comparator and from this there is a PCB top trace labeled SIN COS that ends near the MCL TSC-2-1 two way splitter and a couple of TSM-1 mixers.  This is for sure an I & Q modulator.  These are fed from the fixed 50.0 MHz LO and the 50 - 80 MHz variable LO after amplification with the Avantek amps.

    The ICs that feed the PROMs are: UA139 (Quad Volt conp), MC54HC390 (Dual 4 stage binary ripple counter), MC14070B (Quad 2-input EXOR), MC14015B, CD4013 (Dual D FlipFlop) and MC14093(Q.  Next to this last IC is a 6 pin header marked:

    BU 1-6 Buss on both Transmitter boards and elsewhere

    Pin
    Name
    Function
    1
    TX Probably the Data Input
    2
    RF
    Turns on Modulation
    & ...
    3
    9V
    Powers Mod PCB
    4
    T0
    Output from Mod PCB
    from PROM A4 address line
    maybe a bit clock output
    5
    Tu

    6
    Gnd
    Ground
    The bottom PCB calls this BU 1-6.  This seems to be the extent of the non coax connections to this board.

    RF

    When RF is active the counters and shift registers are allowed to count.  When inactive they are locked in reset mode.  47k pull down resistor. 

    The RF line drives a couple of 4093 NAND gates in series and then drives the reset pins on the 4013, 4015 and 54HC390.  These are the counters that drive the PROMs which in turn drive the A/Ds that do the SIN & COS modulation.  They are only counting when RF is high and reset otherwise.  Modulation will only be present when RF is active.

    Note that RF does NOT turn the Transmitter RF off.  Tdc must be used for that.

    T0 aka TCL

    Is a 1 kHz output clock with a 1 k Ohm source resistance from 4093 NAND pin 10 on the modulator PCB.
    This is the same as pin 12  (TCL) on the Transmitter Controller DB-25 connector.  This is strange since the function of TCL is to bypass the Transmitter Power Amp and send the low power modulator output signal directly to the Antenna Tuner. 

    Note that the 1 kHz clock does not appear when the RF line is inactive.  It may be that the there are other logic states that keep the 1 kHz turned off, like during antenna tuning and the clock only appears when data is being sent.

    This signal is not always connecteed the the Tx control DB-25 connector pin 12.

    When in the RTBBX configuration DB-25 pin 12 has noise, but when Tdc is pulled high the noise goes away and the voltage goes to zero.

    TX 

    Changes one PROMs A7 line, but NOT the other PROM.  This could be for one of two different reasons (ony one of which is correct):
    (1) when not TX then use a different PROM data pattern (i.e. a possible tune mode)
    (2) when TX send a "1" and when not TX send a "0" (i.e. TX is the data input).

    Tu

    Most likley the Tune line.  It is neither a pure input nor a pure output, but rather a buss line.  It ends up controlling an input (pin 9) to the UA139 comparator.  The other input to this gate (pin 8) is from the 200 kHz input.  The U6 comparator also has another gate input (pin 10) that gets the 200 kHz input signal at the same level as pin 8 but the other input seems to be from a fixed DC level.  The two comparator outputs from the UA139 are feed into (pins 1 & 2) one of the gates of the 4070 XOR and the output (pin 3) feeds the clock input of the 54HC390 counter that drives the A0 through A4 address inputs of both PROMs.  The circuit surrounding the UA139 only has the Tu input (the only place Tu is used on the mod PCB), the two identical 200 kHz inputs and the two comparator outputs driving the XOR gate.  There are no other outputs from the UA139.  This rules out the use of modulation on the 200 kHz input as the data signal since with the stock setting (2a=2b)of ST7 the 200 kHz goes nowhere else.


    3  +9V - feed from the S200C adj. Voltage Reg that's next to the BYS28-15 Dual Diode. This is the power to the modulation  Top Tx PCB.

    There are 5 coax cables connected to this PCB:
    ST3 input 50M goes to 20-A2 . (Fixed freq from Rx to mix with variable LO to get Tx freq)
    ST6 input 52..80 M  goes to 20-A1  (variable LO from Rx that's 50.2 MHz above Rx frequency, i.e. in the 50 to 80 MHz range)
    ST4 output 2...30M, RUECKM. this goes to the 17-A3 coax in the 3 coax connector that mates with the Antenna Coupler.
    ST5 output 2...30M MOD. goes to P/IN on the bottom PCB (RFm)  The actual low power signal to be transmitted.
    ST2 200 KHZ this cable ends near the UA139, all the other cables are on the analog side of this PCB.  This is a mystery signal. 

    Today (3 Nov '04) I think it's a clock for the modulation circuits.  The idea would be this 200 KHz clock drives a counter that in turn drives the 28L22 PROMs address lines which are identical and contain a table that can be addressed to provide either a SIN or COS function depending on how they are addressed.  200 kHz divided by 256 is 781.250 Hz which is an audio frequency.

    There's a single crystal "12KV688, XF-500" that seems to be part of a band pass filter with transformers on either side for matching.  Most of the filters in the FS5000 have 0.1" spacing headers at the input and output, probably to allow tuning the filter independently of the circuitry on the board.  This may be a 500 Hz wide pass band filter.

    There are 4 Mini Circuits Labs mixers on this board, a MCL power splitter, and 8 Avantk unit amplifiers (GPD-120 and GPD-130).

    The LM209H is a TO-5 packaged +5 Volt regulator that takes in the +9 from the BU 1-6 buss and powers most of the 40xx series ICs.

    Tx Bottom PCB RF Amp & Output Filter

    Tx Bot PCBThe RF power amp consists of an MRF134 (about 3 Watts out) driving a small transformer then an ON4347 driving a larger transformer then a coax marked ST15 going to the center of a filter bank using 9 each DPDT relays 16 inductors and 48 caps.   There's also what may be a high VSWR detector.  Beside the filter bank there a string of 9 small green LEDs.

    The BYS28-45 is a Dual Schottky diode where the center pin is a common cathode.  Although the large diameter wires appear connected to this part, only the large orange wire is directly connected.  The others probably are routed thorugh the gray ST1-DC12V relay with contacts rated for 5 AMps @ 30 VDC.  This is probably the Tx on-off control relay.  All of the relays hve 12 Volt coils.

    With the Antenna coupler mated to the Transmitter and no DC power applied the DC resistance between the Red Antenna jack (26) on the Antenna Coupler and the A4 coax on the Receiver interface connector (20) is under 1 Ohm.  So when the Transmitter is turned off by the gray relay the combined Transmitter and Antenna Coupler just directly connect the long wire antenna to the receiver.

    The 4 coax cables leaving this PCB are:
    ASG output cable marked ASG goes to connector 17-A2 mates with Antenna Coupler or with X Box coax probably the RF output (ASG is German for Antenna Tuner Unit)
    RFTU cable marked P/TU goes to 17-A1 to/from Antenna Coupler
    RFM cable marked P/IN goes to ST5 on the to PCB (2...30M, MOD.)
    EMP input cable marked EMPF - goes to connector 20-A4 "Emp" stands for Empfanger which means receiver

    There are a couple of SG203J ICs containing 7 relay driver Darlingtons.  Inputs are pins 1 to 7 with corresponding outputs on pins 16 through 10 with pin 9 being the common of 7 clamping diodes from each output pin.  Each output is good for 500 ma of relay current.  The nearby MC14011B Quad 2 input NAND is probably part of the logic decoding for the relay drivers.  There are also 4 small green LEDs near by that may indicate the relay channel status.  One of the 2003 chips is next to the output filter bank (there's a string of 9 small green LEDs nearby) and the other is near where the P/IN and P/TU coax cables terminate.

    The CD4028BF is a 4 line to 10 line BCD to decimal decoder that's driving the 2003.  Where are the control signals coming from?

    Transmitter Control Connector (20) 4 Coax + 17 pins

    Pin
    Function
    BU 1-6
    Antenna Coupler
    A1
    50 - 80 MHz LO from Rx


    A2
    50.0 MHz LO from Rx


    A3
    200 kHz Clock from Rx


    A4
    Long wire ant to Rx
    used when whip not installed


    1
    Ground

    4
    2


    3
    3


    2
    4


    7
    5


    1
    6


    9
    7



    8



    9



    10

    1 = TX

    11

    2 = RF

    12

    4 = TCL

    13



    14



    15



    16
    + 12 to Receiver


    17
    Ground



    Transmitter DC Power Connector (21)

    Note that while this connector looks similar to the Tx Control Connector, the A1 through A4 positions are filled with DC contacts, not coax contacts.  It can be used to power the Transmitter from the Battery Charger + AC Mains power supply, or from a couple of batteries using the H Bar.

    Why are there two ways to use battery power?  Maybe to allow continuos operation while batteries are changed?  This is no mistake, the two battery positions on the H Bar can only be used this way.

    Pin
    Function
    A1
    DC Ground
    side battery (18) thermistor
    A2
    nc
    A3
    heavy brown wire
    Battery charging?
    A4
    +14.0 V from Batt Chgr
    1

    2
    center battery (19) thermistor
    3
    Battery 2 +
    4

    5

    6

    7

    8
    side Battery (18) thermistor
    9
    center battery (19) thermistor
    10

    11

    12

    13

    14

    15

    16
    Battery 1 +
    17
    Battery 1 & 2 -
    The thermistor connections indicate that the batteries can be charged while the system is in the TCAMR23 AC Mains powered Receive - Transmit configuration.

    18 Nov 2004 - Scope Testing Tx while powered

    Configuration MCRTX with top cover removed.  Breakout of Transmitter Control connector pins. Using 3 ea. AA bateries in series with 1 k Ohm as source for Tx Ctrl input.

    +4.5 to Tdc causes a relay to click and BU 1-6 looks like:
    Tx Ctrl
    Pin:
    1 T
    2 RF
    3 9v
    4 T0
    5 Tu
    Tdc = +4.14 Vdc:
    0.01
    0.002
    9.08
    5.02
    13.91
    Tdc = +4.14
    RF = +4.14

    0.003
    3.44 9.11
    note 1
    14.06
    note 1 - T0 is a pulse waveform.  0 to +5 volts, period of 500 uS, high for 400 uS and low for 100 uS, frequency 2 kHz

    A0 = 20 kHz sq wave
    AD7524 D/A pin Rfb is 500 Hz sinewave
    ST10 = 50 MHz sine wave
    stopped testing - X Box is hot

    19 Nov 2004 - Spectrum Analyzer Tx

    The crystal filter between ST11 (input) and ST12 (output) uses a single series crystal (single pole) centered at 50.000 MHz.  The 50.0 MHz signal that comes into the modulator board at ST3 is amplified and I & Q mixed with a 500 Hz data signal from the digital modulator and the modulated 50.0 MHz signal is passes through the crystal filter to get rid of some sidebands.  It's then mixed with the variable LO signal )Rx freq + 50.20 MHz) to produce a final frequency of Rx + 200 kHz.  This signal is filtered and then amplified then comes out ST5.

    There is another signal path where the amplified but un modulated input 50.0 Mhz signal gets mixed with the Variable LO to produce the same output frequency as above and this signal is sent to ST4 called RUECKM and is used by the Antenna coupler.

    Looking at the 500 Hz sin signal at ST8 with Tdc and RF pulled high and briefly pulling TX high casuses the spectrm to widen for a short time then look normal, so by using "data hold" on the spectrum analyzer and stroking the TX line with +5 V the SA captures the widened signal centered at 500 Hz.  So TX is the data input line and it needs to be changed to cause the spreading.

    With Tx control lines Tdc and RF pulled high the BU 1-6 buss T0 line has a 2 kHz signal, but NOT pin 12 on Tx DB-245 control connector, so the ohmic path that's there with power off is not there when Tdc and Rf are activated.

    Antenna Auto Coupler

    Antenna Auto CouplerThe Antenna Auto Coupler can be placed on top of the transmitter.  It attaches to the top of the Transmitter using 4 screws (28).  The transmit antenna plugs into the Red banana socket (26).  The ground connection is the metal block (27) next to the red antenna jack. 

    The connector (24) on the Antenna Auto Coupler has 3 coax connections, not just the single coax like the X-Box.

    The groove (25) holds the metal locking plates ("1" and "2") that latch the batteries and receiver.




    Ant Cplr PCB
    There are 3 major functions in the Antenna Coupler:
    1. Relay controlled ten Inductors and capacitors to match the long wire antenna.
    There is a long 0.1" spacing test header "LUM"  that indicates there are 8 capacitors and 11 inductors in the coupler matching circuit.  There's also an "SP1" function.
    The coax from the Transmitter PA board RFTU cable marked P/TU goes to the A1 connector on the Ant Cplr.
    The coax from the Transmitter PA board ASG goes to the A2 connector on the Ant Cplr.  This is the actual 2..30 MHz signal to/from the FS5000 receiver/transmitter.  Both of these cables seem to be connected in the relay nest on either side of what may be a current sensing transformer.

    The purpose of the RFTU and 2...30M, RUECKM signals is not known at this time.

    2. Analog circuitry to measure impedance, VSWR, or whatever to determine what to do.
    The A3 coax from the Transmitter ( ST4 output 2...30M, RUECKM.on modulator PCB) mating connector goes to a cable marked ST3 that feeds a couple of Avantek GPD-130 amps which in turn feed a couple of MCL TFM3N-830 mixers.  Then there are a couple of CA3140 op amps then 3 each CA3130 op amps.

    The presence of the two mixers near the shield wall and the lack of doides indicates that the RF signals from the sampler are mixed down to either Dc or something close that can be processed by op amps.

    The AD0804 is an 8 bit differential input A/D converter.  Probably fed from the CD4066 analog switch that has 4 independent SPST switches.  It's not clear how the 54HC138 3 to 8 decoder is being used.

    There's a set of 6 each  0.1" type jumpers between the analog circuitry and the uC with the labels:
    UA
    PR - Power Reflected
    PV - Power Forward
    UV
    UR
    RS
    The V probably stands for Voltage and the A for current (like in Amps), and R for Resistance, RS maybe VSWR or Reflection Coefficient in German?

    There is a section that has metal shielding walls that contains the actual L and C elements along with the relays that do the matching.  There are no semiconductor junctions inside this shielded volume.  There is also a sampler made up of 2 ferrite torroids each wound with a coil of wire and both of these have a single conductor running through their centers.  The sampler is located very close to the A1 and A2 coax cables.  The two adjustments near the sampler are marked  V and R.

    3. Microcontroller to operate the Antenna Coupler, and maybe the FS5000?
    The NSC800 is the uC.  A 2.4576 MHz crystal supplies its clock.  There are a couple of NSC810 I/O chips that drive the four SG2003 relay drivers providing 28 relay drivers and there are 22 relays.

    An MMC27C32QE EPROM with it's window covered with an aluminum sticker marked 2.143.98 and an MM82PC12  8 bit I/O port

    This uC may also run the rest of the FS5000.  Of the unknown function connector pins FC, FF, TR and T only FC appears on the DB-25 Tx control connector.  The only way this might work would be that this is a Frequency Control serial data stream.  Note that the Receiver also has a connection to this line, but that would imply that the receiver can decode the Frequency Control signal, and then there would be no need for the Antenna Coupler uC to work with it, unless they both listen to an external frequency input?

    Antenna Coupler Connector (Conn 24)


    Pin
    Label
    Con 20
    Rx Interface
    Function
    A1
    RF Tu
    na
    maybe the exciter low pwr RF signal
    used for preliminary tuning
    A2
    To/From Ant
    A4 after
    T/R relay
    antenna
    zero ohms to antenna terminal when off
    A3
    RUECKM
    na
    maybe an LO for mixing the Tx down to 200 kHz to meas match using op amps
    might have I & Q channels
    1
    F3 5
    Band Indicator
    10 k to NSC810-24
    2
    F1 3
    Band Indicator
    10 k to NSC810-22
    3
    F0 2
    Band Indicator
    10 k to NSC810-21
    4
    GND 1
    ground
    5
    T
    Factory Test
    4.7 k to gnd
    6
    Batt +ve
    DC power
    Turned on when Tx is on
    7
    F2 4
    Band Indicator
    10 k to NSC810-23
    8
    TR
    ATU control of T/R relay
    on Tx PCB
    4.7 k to gnd
    9
    FC 6
    ?
    10 k to NSC810-39
    10
    FF
    ?
    10 k to NSC810-28

    The following 6 pins have a 10 k Ohm resistor in series to one of the NSC810 pins:
    F0, F1, F2, F3, FC, FF which may indicate that these are inputs.  The T and TR lines have 4.7 k Ohm resistors to ground.

    11 Nov 2004 - Possible Theory of Opertion

    The exciter output from the Transmitter modulator PCB gets switched by a relay to the A1 RF Tu (RF Tune?) connector during preliminary antenna tuning.  The Transmitter modulator PCB also sends the ST4 output 2...30M, RUECKM signal at the same frequency as the data but without any modulation to the antenna coupler as a LO to down convert the RF sampled signals DC (also called a Direct Conversion receiver)  to allow the antenna coupler to measure the match.  Once the antenna is matched then the exciter is switched to the power amp input.

    The request for the unmodulated signal is the TCL line on the BU 1-6 buss.  If the TCL line is controlled by the hardware then it is the output side of a handshake with the transmitter controller that holds off the data stream until the antenna has been matched.  If TCL is an input line then there may need to be another line that's the data hold off handshake.

    The modulator 2..30 RUECKM unmodulated signal is only sent to the Antenna Coupler and acts as the LO for the VSWR measurement circuits.  There is a relay near the power amp input that may select to send the 2..30 MODulated signal to either the ANtenna Coupler (connector A1) or to the power amplifier.  This may be in response to a high VSWR indication.  By sending the low power modulated signal to the Antenna coupler there is a signal there to allow retuning and once tuned and the VSWR is back down the power amp can then be switched back in line.

    Battreries

    Battery Connector


    The "D" style connector (29) has a couple of large contacts which are the terminals.

    When looking at the battery connector with the long side of the "D" at the top, the left large socket (A2) is the Negative (-) terminal and the right large socket (A1) is the Positive (+) terminal.  The small sockets are numbered as follows:
    1 = upper right
    2 = upper left = thermistor
    3 = lower right = thermistor
    5 = lower left



    Battery

    The plastic part (30) provides the latching action for the "1" metal latching plate.  A fuse (31) is marked T101 and there is a spare fuse (32) on the rear face of the battery.  The metal thing (33) is a vent that lets gas out but does not let water in.

    By using a piece of 3x5 card stock as an insulator and the stock clips on my Maha C777Plus battery charger, the battery can be charged.  It's now reading 17 volts while on charge.  Once charged I'll discharge it using the Maha to see what the capacity is now.
    After 1 hour of charging 0.754 AH have been put into the battery.

    Wireless For The Warrior Vol. 4 lists the battery capacity as 14.4 Volts 1.2 Amp Hours, which is a little more than 17 Watt Hours.  If the transmitter puts out 40 Watts and is 50% efficient (I have not measured the current draw while transmitting) then the current might be 5.5 Amps.  The Amp Hour capacity of a battery does not remain constant as the current is varied, but decreases and the current is increased above the 20 hour rate.  For a 1.2 Amp Hour battery the 20 hour rate is 60 milliamps.  So instead of expecting to get 1.2 AH/ 5.5 A = 0.2 hours = 13 minutes time 2 for two batteries = 26 minutes, the actual capacity of the batteries will be more like 5 or 10 minutes of transmit time for both of them.

    Note the fuse is rated for 10 Amps, probably correct for transmitter use, but way too strong to protect the receiver from mishandling.  The receiver Synthesizer PCB that connects the DB-25 Tx controller connector and the Tx interface connector as well as supplying DC to the receiver is a 3 or 4 layer PCB with traces that can carry about 0.4 amps.  10 amps will blow out the traces.

    Battery Charger

    Battery Charger & AC
        SupplyThe Chrager has two uses.  One is to charge batteries and the other is to supply DC to the transmitter.

    The battery charger can be powered by either a "12 Volt" source connected to the Red and Black 5-Way binding posts (34) or from the AC Mains power supply "M" using terminals (48) which will work with inputs from 110 to 240 VAC. 

    The charger can charge one or two batteries in the 10 hour mode or two batteries in the fast mode.  The charger can charge the batteries either through the H bar adapter or through the transmitter.

    So far I have not been able to get the B2 light (42) to come on.  I've tried connecting a single battery to both possible locations and tried two batteries.  The Fast Charge (38), 10 Hour charge (40) and B1 (41) lights work as you would expect.  Also have not been able to get any of the Power Check LEDs: Full (45), OK (46) or Low (47) to come on.  When the Power Check button (44) is pressed it turns off charging.

    On the big connector pin 12 is connected to pin 13 and pin 15 is connected to pin 17 (ground).  The two outside large connections are A1 ground and A4 +14.0 Volts to power the Transmitter, the other  high current DC pins may be for charging batteries when they are on the Transmitter..  Note that high current DC pins are not used for charging batteries with the H bar.

    Mains AC Power Supply

    Mains AC Pwr SplyThe line cord connector (52) is the same as used for the brick power supply common to lap top computers, I used the one from my Sony VIAO.  The fuse (53) and spare fuse (54) are nearby.  There are four captive screws (55) that allow attaching the Mains supply to the battery charger.

    On the bottom of the Mains power supply are a couple of metal contacts (56) that pass 14 VDC to the Battery Charger terminals (48).

    Note that the power supply is not strong enough to charge the batteries and power the transmitter.


    Configurations

    I frimly believe that this system has been designed to be as idiot proof as possible.  In some cases they have have used two methods to prevent making a wrong connection.  So any configuration that can be made is very likley to be a valid one.  The strings of capital letters in the following titles are the ID letters of the components in the setup.  For example MCHBB is composed of the Mains power supply, battery Charger, "H" connector bolck and two Batteries.

    MCTABBK Normal Use

    MCTABBK Normal UseIf the FS5000 was keept in the nice shipping boxes the Ni-Cad batteries would be dead.  The most logical way to use the FS5000 is to have the A.C. Mains supply, battery Charger, Transmitter, Antenna coupler and a couple of Batteries and the accessory Kit all connected toghther.  Since the battery Charger can charge the batteries through the transmitter this would be the normal use configuration.  Every so often, say once a week (month, quarter?) one of the batteries would be removed and discharged to be sure there was no Ni-Cad memory problem.  If just after discharging one battery there was an emergency and the A.C. mains power went down, the radio still would work from the other battery.  This is probably why there are two batteries.

    The Accessory Kit (my letter for it) is designed to plug into the side of the receiver and snap down onto the corner of the Charger.  When this is done the void under the accessory Kit, the Mains supply + charger and the Receiver is about 45 mm high, 125 mm wide (150 mm including a DB-25m connector) and 100 mm deep.  So these might the the dimensions of the missing Transmitter Controller.

    TA23 Installing the Metal Locking Plates

    Trans + AntHere the Antenna Coupler has been connected to the Transmitter after first installing the "2" and "3" metal locking plates.  The Receiver can be locked using the "2" plate and the combined Mains supply and Battery Charger can be locked using the "3" plate. 

    Note the locking plates need to be installed prior to using screws to attach the top and bottom parts.



    TCAMR23 AC Mains powered Receive - Transmit

    Trans, Ant Cplr,
          Mains, ChargThis is an configuration combines the Transmitter, Antenna Coupler, Mains power supply, Battery charger and Receiver, latched together using screws for up-down connection and metal plates "2" and "3" for horizontal connection.

    This would be used for a transceiver system that's powered from the AC mains.  The Charger is not being used for charging or any electrical purpose, but just to assist the metal latching plates to hold every thing together.


    Note that this configuration uses the (21) connector, that's the big one on the side of the transmitter with 17 sockets and 4 high current DC positions, to connect to the Charger.  This means that the (21) connector is NOT available for connecting to the missing transmitter controller.  But the (6) connector, the standard DB-25 connector on the receiver, is available to control the system.

    This has an interesting implication.  To get to the configuration TARBB112 starting from the TCAMR23 setup, the Mains PS and Charger are removed by sliding the "3" locking plate back and then adding a couple of batteries (the Transmitter and Antenna Coupler need to be separated to get the two "1" locking plates installed.  Note that in the TARBB112 Battery powered configuration there's a space to connect the missing Transmitter controller.  A conjecture is that when using the system in the filed with battery power the missing controller is needed, but when using the system from a mains power supply the missing controller is not needed and something needs to be connected to the DB-25 connector (6) on the Receiver.

    A quick check with a Ohm meter shows the the DB-25 connector has pins 23 and 25 tied to chassis ground.  This is NOT compatable with the standard pin out for a PC serial (COM) port.  So this conector has some special pin out.

    TARBB112 Battery Powered Receive Transmit

    Batt Tx & Rx
    The two Batteries and Receiver are all on the Transmitter front panel held there by the "1", "1" and "2" metal locking plates.

    On the right face there are two ways more units might be attached.  The Transmitter Controller would still fit on the Receiver using the locking lever.  Something else, or maybe the Transmitter Controller using a different face could be attached to the Transmitter using the "3" metal locking plate.

    MCHBB Battery Charging from A.C. Mains

    Batt ChargingCharging the batteries from the A.C. mains is done using the mains supply "M" stacked on top of the Battery charger "C".  The connecting block "H" joins the two batteries to the charger.  When charging batteries it's handy to have at least one of the "S" State of Charge indicators as well as the "F" discharger handy.   Note that the two batteries have different serial numbers (3186 & 5186 in my cae) and likewise the two State of Charge indicators have serial numbers that match the battery serial numbers.  This way each system part has a unique ID+serial number.
    Discharging the two batteries on the Maha gives the following data:
    Time min
    B-5186
    mAH
    Volts
    Time min
    B-3186
    mAH Volts
    28
    158
    15.1
    0
    0
    16.2
    53
    297
    14.7
    49
    274
    14.5
    111
    623
    14.4
    107
    602
    14.3
    147
    823
    14.1
    131
    735
    14.2
    167
    935
    13.8
    167
    939
    13.8
    176 end
    985 13.6 175
    982
    12.7

    After the Maha had finished discharging B-3186 the "S" battery checker was installed and it's LED glowed Green.  But when the "F" discharger is plugged onto B-3186 it's green LED flashes for a fraction of a second and then is dark.  The "S" tester is off at 12.0 Volts and on bright at 13.5 Volts.

    After leaving a couple of batteries on the charger overnight, in the morning the A.C. Mains supply LED is green and the FULL (45) led is green, all other LEDs have turned off, i.e. charging has stopped and neither battery is being charged.

    Discharger
          "F"The "F" battery discharger has a male type connector to mate with the battery female connector.  It has it's own "1" metal latching plate to allow fixing it to the battery being discharged.  This would be convenient for field use where they could be mated and then put in a pack sack without worry about them coming apart.







    RHB Portable Receiver

    Batt RcvrThis receiver is composed of one battery, the "H" connector block and receiver.  The earphone and telescoping antenna from the accessory kit are used.  It does not appear that any of the metal locking plates can be used so this system can only be used on a flat surface, not at all a field portable configuration.  This may have been used for testing.

    I can pickup a local AM station and WWV, but need to collapse the antenna and move away from my computer.
    With the receiver set for 3000 Hz bw, delta freq centered, freq 20000.  HP 8648A sig gen set for 20.00000 MHz (Fc), SIN modulation and varying the modulation frequency the tuning LEDs on the receiver switch so that "+" is on for 1.1 kHz and above and "_" for 1 kHz and below.  The earphone sounds tones from about 600 Hz to 2.7 kHz. With the sig gen RF off the "-" LED is on mostly, but sometimes noise causes them both to flicker. 

    Using just a CW carrier from the sig gen both LEDs are off at Fc + 880 Hz, the "-" LED is on at Fc+1010 Hz through Fc + 1070 Hz then the "+" LED is on at Fc +1080 Hz through Fc +  3320 Hz where noise is heard and the "+" LED flickers, higher RF frequency is out of the receiver passband.  So it looks like the "+" and "-" LEDs are fed from a crossover filter centered at a nominal 1 KHz above the tuned frequency (i.e. USB).  Tuning the sig gen below 20 MHz produces no receiver output, i.e. it not an AM receiver.

    Links

    H. Meyer - FS5000 - uses QPSK in German
    Photos (probably of my unit since I bought it from Warren)
    English/German Translations done for the SEM-25 but applicable here
    Another German -> English web page -
    odu connectors - this may be the manufacturer of the connectors used between boxes.
    Amphenol Canada TW17 series Sub-D connectors might also work -RG-179 (75 Ohm) is mechanically very similar to RG-174 (50 Ohm)
    Com Block - makes QPSK and OQPSK building blocks
    Serial demodulation of an OQPSK direct sequence spread signal -
    Performance of Coded Offset Quadrature Phase-Shift Keying (OQPSK) and MIL-STD Shaped OQPSK (SOQPSK) with Iterative Decoding -
    Monitoring Utility Stations - Digital Modes Section  - PSK and QAM systems -Burst - FARCOS -
    Positronic - may also make a Combo D series connector that will work - email in to them to see.
    FS5000 radio - details on the computer parallel port interface.

    Patents

    Modulator

    Class 332 is Modulators, 375 is Pulse or Digital Communications, 455 is Telecommunications
    While none of these patents is directly related to the FS5000 Modulator, they might helping understanding it.
    4626803 Apparatus for providing a carrier signal with two digital data streams I-Q modulated thereon Dec 2, 1986 332/151; 375/298
    4540958  Zero IF frequency-modulator Sep 10, 1985 332/128; 455/42; 455/102
    4438413 Serial minimum shift keyed modulator including notch and bandpass filters March 20, 1984 332/100; 375/305
    Patents where Siemens is the assignee & the Class contains 332 -
    4617537 Method for digital quadrature amplitude modulation Oct 14, 1986 332/151; 332/108; 375/261 - Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM)
    4003002 Modulation and filtering device Jan 11, 1977 332/185; 332/170; 375/296; 375/301
    4086536 Single sideband transmitter apparatus Apr 25, 1978 455/109; 332/170; 455/118
    4433310 Modulator-demodulator for four level double amplitude modulation on quadrature carriers Feb 21, 1984 332/151; 329/306; 375/269; 375/343
    5418818 Digital signal processor exciter May 23, 1995 375/264; 375/216; 375/224; 375/356; 455/92; 455/102; 455/118; 455/503
    4843613 Digitally implemented modulators June 27, 1989 375/295; 332/117; 375/269; 375/303; 375/308 - includes some calculations of PROM sizes for given conditions.  An audio passband modulator.
    4613976  Constant envelope offset QPSK modulator Sep 23, 1986 375/279; 332/103; 375/281; 375/308 - Fig 1 uses two ROMs, one for I and one for Q, followed by D/A converters.

    Daimler Chrysler, Echotel Series ACE 1800 Modem (1800 Bd QPSK Serial Tone) Used in connection with the "FARCOS" system (=Fast Adaptive HF Radio Communications System) - This is a good fit to the FS5000 modulator. It's interesting that this type of modem is made by EADS, a German company that took over Siemens Defence.
    Utility Monitoring Central - Austria use of Ecotel -

    Patents

    Modulation

    4780884 Suppressed double-sideband communication system, Peter D. Karabinis (AT&T), Mar 3, 1986, 375/261, 375/270, 370/206, 375/301

    4730345 Vestigial sideband signal decoder, Howard C. Reeve, III (AT&T), Apr 4, 1986, 375/321, 327/552

    5663773 Demodulator for a complex-value vestigial sideband signal, Heinz Goeckler (Ant Nachrichtentechnik Gmbh), Dec 16, 1994,
                     348/726, 348/E05.113, 348/736, 329/357, 455/337

    Antenna Coupler

    Class 333 Wave Transmission Lines and Networks

    Miscellaneous

    4162446  Transceiver with only one reference frequency July 24, 1979 455/77; 333/165; 455/83; 455/84 - H.F. radio

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